Tips for Parents – Brain Development

7 3-4 months
Attachment / relationships
Did you know that a baby’s secure attachment is important for brain development?
A secure attachment with a parent is important for healthy development. In order to explore the world, babies need to feel secure. They need to know someone will always be there to help.
  • How can you help your baby feel secure?
    • Comfort and hold your baby, especially when sick, hurt or upset.
    • Be there when your baby is sad, lonely or frightened.
    • Pick up your baby when they cry or show they want to be picked up.
    • Cuddle your baby when they are upset.
    • Share smiles and show you care when your baby needs comforting.
    • Talk to your baby often in a soothing voice, so they can easily recognize your voice when they are upset.
    • Let your baby know you will be there when needed. It will give your baby the confidence to explore and learn.
    • Be consistent. Babies need to know that they can expect the same thing every time from you.
  • You can’t spoil babies by picking them up too often! Babies cry to let you know that they need you. Always comfort a baby who is upset. It will help your baby learn that you will be there when needed. The way you relate to your baby influences how your baby will relate to other people in the future.
  • A secure attachment will help your baby’s brain development. When babies start exploring, they need to know
    their parents are not far away if they need them. If children do not feel safe, they will be less likely to explore and may not fully develop their social skills and self-esteem. It is important for babies to feel secure to build their future independence.
  • Babies can form attachments with several people (father, mother, grandparents, educator). They develop a stronger attachment with at least one person. This person is usually the baby’s main caregiver and the one they spend the most time with.

Building attachment with your baby is one of the most important things you can do as a parent.


Links
  • Attachment. Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development.